Covering the lip of a rope welt

Apply 3/4″ Millennium tape to the wrong side of the fabric and press it down to make a sharp creaseimg0001.jpgHot glue the folded fabric to the rope welt lip  

   After we have hot glued rope welt to the edge of the cornice we need to cover the exposed lip of the cord.  The easiest no-sew way to do this is to make a sharp crease in the fabric by pressing it together with our fingers using 3/4″ Millennium tape.

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No sew welt cord part two

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   On most fabrics a better solution than glue for making welt cord is Millennium Tape from Sacks Industries.  They claim that the bond gets stronger over time but you must test the tape on your fabrics first to make sure the initial bond is a good one.  It won’t work on chenile, faux suede, rubberized upholstery fabric backing, and teflon coated fabrics to name a few.  In the photos I show two rows of  3/8″ Millennium tape, one at the edge and the second about an inch and a quarter below the edge for  1/4″ cord.  Now I find that a single piece of  1/2″ tape placed an inch and a quarter to an inch an a half below the edge is quite sufficient.  In this application pin the ends of your fabric to stretch it somewhat taut.   Apply the tape but leave the paper coating on.  Pin your cord taut and just above the tape.  Since I am right handed it is easier for me to start at the right end of the fabric where I pull off a foot or two of the backing paper and wrap the fabric over the cord.  Then just keep working your way toward the left- pull off more backing paper, wrap more fabric, pull off more backing paper, wrap more fabric until you have reached the other end.  Then go over the whole strip a couple more times pressing the fabric down on to the tape to make sure everything is smooth and bonded well.  With the  lighter weight fabrics such as silk and most polished cottons you can attach the finished cord to the edge of the cornice board with the same Millennium tape and feel confident it will hold forever.

No sew welt cord

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      If you are not fond of sewing there are several ways  of making welt cord using glue and tape.  The glue I use comes from R.W. Rowley and is called fringe adhesive.  It can best be used on an upholstery weight fabric that has a rubberized type of backing to prevent the glue from bleeding through but can also be used if applied sparingly to fabrics with teflon coatings that double sided tape won’t stick to.  In the photo showing the glue technique I’m using 1/4″ cord and run two glue lines with the cord in between.  The first glue line is at the edge of the fabric and the second is about an inch an a quarter to an inch and a half below the edge.  Place pins at the ends of your piece of fabric to make the fabric taut,  spread the glue out with your finger and then pin the ends of the cord taut.  Wrap the fabric over the cord and run your fingers along the overlap.  Initally the glue may let loose but as it starts drying eventually it will bond.  A quicker way to make it set is to press the overlap with a warm iron but be careful to remove all the glue residue from your iron before using it to press other fabric.

An Example of Welt Cord

Welt cord is applied to the edge of the cornice.  Here’s an example:

Cornice board with welt applied to back edge of returns